WARAMI

This is a HOME AT PARRAMATTA initiative.

To find out more about Parramatta, it’s history, culture and heritage and discover an array of online events and activities, check out https://atparramatta.com/homeat.You can stay connected and engaged with Parramatta from the comfort of your home. This is our HOME, from your home. This is HOME AT PARRAMATTA.

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The Apology to the Stolen Generations (Source: Indigenous Film Services)

On our pathway towards reconciliation, Sorry Day on 26 May is an important moment to remember the past policies of forced child removal. Here, we reflect on the sad and painful history of the Stolen Generations and recognise moments of resilience, healing and the power of saying Sorry.

Experience Indigenous culture with WARAMI

‘Members of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities are advised that the this article contains images, names and stories of deceased peoples.’

Sorry Day: 2020

On the 13 February 2008 the newly appointed Prime Minister Kevin Rudd made an historic speech in Federal Parliament. This speech was made to formally apologise on behalf of the government to the Stolen Generations, and he did this through a motion to the Parliament.

We apologise for the laws and policies of successive Parliaments and governments that have inflicted profound grief, suffering and loss on these our fellow Australians.

On Our Pathway Towards Reconciliation

The Apology to the Stolen Generations (Source: Indigenous Film Services) On our pathway towards reconciliation, Sorry Day on 26 May is an important moment to remember the past policies of forced child removal. Here, we reflect on the sad and painful history of the...

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Sorry Day

Officially, National Sorry Day marks the anniversary of the tabling in Federal Parliament of the Bringing Them Home Report of the National Inquiry into the Separation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children from Their Families, on 26 May 1997. The day...

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World War One – William Castles – Darug Soldier

William Castles was a 19 year old coal carter whose mother Ada Locke and father Thomas Castles were stated to be dead when he enlisted 15 May 1916. Philippa Scarlett has written an article on William's aboriginal and Darug heritage which details his relationships in...

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Significant Aboriginal women: Maria Lock

Artist impression of Maria Lock. Maria's Dilemma and the Darug Legacy, 2009, by Darug artist Leanne Tobin. Courtesy the artist. Photo Adam Hollingworth [3]. Maria, the daughter of Yarramundi ‘Chief of the Richmond Tribes’, belonged to the Boonooberongal clan of the...

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Significant Aboriginal women: Patyegarang

Image of a young Aboriginal woman, possibly Patyegarang [2]. Patyegarang was an Aboriginal woman living in the Sydney region at the arrival of the First Fleet in 1788, who played a significant role in early contact between Aboriginal and British people. Patyegarang...

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Significant Aboriginal women: Kitty

This record is titled: Parramatta Native Institution Admission List: 10 January 1814 to 28 December 1820. [1] Kitty belonged to the Cannemegal (Warmuli) or Prospect clan of the Darug people [2]. Kitty’s parents, birth name and birth date are unknown, but records...

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Significant Aboriginal women: Shirley Colleen Smith

Mum Shirl (Mrs Shirley Smith), Town Hall, Sydney, 1988. Source: National Library of Australia Shirley Smith (better known as ‘Mum Shirl’), an Aboriginal woman of Wiradjuri descent, was born Shirley Colleen Perry on Erambie Reserve in Cowra on 21 November 1924 [1]....

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Significant Aboriginal women: Barangaroo

Bannelang [Bennelong] meeting the Governor by appointment after he was wounded by Will [Nille?] ma ring in September 1790. Source: Natural History Museum (London) Barangaroo was an Aboriginal woman from the area around North Harbour and Manly. She was a member of the...

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Waves of People Report

The City of Parramatta Council has been working with historians and researchers at Western Sydney University’s Institute for Culture and Society to explore stories of people moving in, through and around Parramatta. We’ve captured some of them in this new publication:...

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Darug People and the Environment

Aboriginal peoples in the Sydney Basin would have experienced extreme climate change effects around 18,000 years ago as the ice sheets melted and inundated the continental shelf — perhaps forcing a movement westward. The site known as Darling Mills SF2 at West Pennant...

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