Significant Aboriginal women: Maria Lock

Significant Aboriginal women: Maria Lock

Artist impression of Maria Lock. Maria’s Dilemma and the Darug Legacy, 2009, by Darug artist Leanne Tobin. Courtesy the artist. Photo Adam Hollingworth [3].

Maria, the daughter of Yarramundi ‘Chief of the Richmond Tribes’, belonged to the Boonooberongal clan of the Darug people [1].

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Significant Aboriginal women: Patyegarang

Significant Aboriginal women: Patyegarang

Image of a young Aboriginal woman, possibly Patyegarang [2].

Patyegarang was an Aboriginal woman living in the Sydney region at the arrival of the First Fleet in 1788, who played a significant role in early contact between Aboriginal and British people.

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Significant Aboriginal women: Kitty

Significant Aboriginal women: Kitty

This record is titled: Parramatta Native Institution Admission List: 10 January 1814 to 28 December 1820. [1]

Kitty belonged to the Cannemegal (Warmuli) or Prospect clan of the Darug people [2]. Kitty’s parents, birth name and birth date are unknown, but records indicate that she was five years of age when placed in the Parramatta Native Institution on 28 December 1814, the same day as Maria Lock [3]. (more…)

Significant Aboriginal women: Barangaroo

Significant Aboriginal women: Barangaroo

Bannelang [Bennelong] meeting the Governor by appointment after he was wounded by Will [Nille?] ma ring in September 1790. Source: Natural History Museum (London)

Barangaroo was an Aboriginal woman from the area around North Harbour and Manly. She was a member of the Cammeraygal clan, who were considered to be the largest and most influential group of the Eora, the Aboriginal people of the Sydney coastal region [1].

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200 years of the Female Factory

200 years of the Female Factory

North Parramatta, Female Factory, ‘Sleeping Ward’, built c.1825. Photograph: Peter Arfanis, City of Parramatta.

2018 marks the bicentenary of the largest and oldest surviving convict women’s site in Australia: the Parramatta Female Factory.

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Dr Sydney Evan Jones: Mental health pioneer

Dr Sydney Evan Jones: Mental health pioneer

Portrait of Sydney Evan Jones as a medical student, c.1910. Source: Friends of Mays Hill Cemetery Photograph Collection

The ground-breaking career of Dr Sydney Evan Jones (1887-1948), one of Australia’s earliest psychiatrists and doctor on Sir Douglas Mawson’s expedition to the Antarctic, has strong connections to the Parramatta area. Parramatta is also Dr Jones’s final resting place.

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