Origins of Parramatta District Street Names

The area comprising present-day Parramatta was first inhabited by the Burramattagal people, a clan of the Darug, who settled along the upper reaches of the Parramatta River approximately 60,000 years ago.

On November 4, 1788, Governor Arthur Phillip established a settlement in the area currently known as Parramatta Park. The town ‘Rose Hill’, was renamed ‘Parramatta’ in 1791, in acknowledgement of the name used by the Burramattagal.

Work on laying out the town commenced in 1790, with George Street leading from the wharf to Government House. Over the years, Parramatta rapidly grew as the administrative, residential and industrial centre for Western Sydney. The streets built to connect these places were given names which reflect the changing history and focus of the community, including a greater recognition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander history and culture.

 

Parramatta Central Business District (CBD) Street Names
Street name Date Suburb Origin & meaning Source
 Note: This is not a complete listing and we will be adding more street names once research has been completed.
Abbey Lane North Parramatta Parramatta City Council (PCC) Street name register pdf
Aird Street 1814 Parramatta The name “Aird” was connected with an estate owned by a member of Mrs. Macquarie’s family in Appin, a small coastal village in Argyllshire, Scotland. William Aird superintended all government building work in the Parramatta District. PCC street name register pdf
Wickham, J. A. & Yeend, P. J., 1979, Origins of names of suburbs, streets, and localities in and about the Parramatta area. Parramatta, NSW: The King’s School Archive Society.
Jervis, J. 1935, ‘The development of settlement in the town of Parramatta’, Journal and Proceedings of the Parramatta District Historical Society, vol. 4, p. 72.
Kass, T., Liston, C., & McClymont, J., 1996, Parramatta: a past revealed., Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council, p. 99.
Alaska Lane c1884 East Parramatta Origin of Name is unclear. In the subdivisions of the Newlands Estate, the Betts family (related in marriage to the Marsden family) used the name Alaska twice. At the time, the word meant “good land” and in all probability was a name that the Betts family associated with the property being subdivided. City of Parramatta, c1994, Suburban names review: part 1. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council.
Albert Lane Parramatta PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Albert Street c1868 North Parramatta or East Parramatta. The initial section of this street commenced off Church Street prior to 1844 suggesting that the name was an acknowledgement to either the Prince Consort or the son of Queen Victoria. When extended to its full length in 1868 the same name was carried throughout. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
City of Parramatta, c1994, Suburban names review: part 1. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council.
Albert Street East (Previous name: Albert Street) 26.06.1946 North Parramatta or East Parramatta. Parramatta City Council approved alteration of street name of section of Albert Street between McArthur and Web Street Parramatta City Council—Alteration of street name, 1946, July 5, Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales, p. 1534
Alfred Street c1883 Parramatta Acknowledging (Sir) Alfred Stephen, Chief Justice and former Lieutenant Governor of NSW, in ‘family members and legal friends’ street naming theme, Sir Alfred being the father of subdivider, Solicitor S. A. Stephen. City of Parramatta, c1994, Suburban names review: part 1. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council.
PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Alma Street c1850s Parramatta Named after the Al’ma River 12 miles north of Sebastopol where a battle took place in 1854 during the Crimean War (1854-56). In line with street naming theme of a significant event. Real estate reminiscences 1913, February 26, Sydney Mail, p. 25
Amos Street Parramatta PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Anderson Street Parramatta 1895 survey was a continuation of Wentworth Street. Dr Mathew Anderson (1788-1852) resident surgeon at Parramatta from 1829-1841 also a magistrate and personal physician to the Macarthur family. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Kass, T., Liston, C., & McClymont, J., 1996, Parramatta: a past revealed. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council, p 102.
Andrew Nash Lane Parramatta Named after Andrew Nash, a convict turned businessman who purchased and changed the Freemason’s Arms in 1821 to the Woolpack Inn. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Kass, T., Liston, C., & McClymont, J., 1996, Parramatta: a past revealed. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council, p 78.
Argus Lane 1895 survey; gazetted 01/05/1964; resolution 16/04/1964 Parramatta Probably named after the Argus Newspaper, Cumberland Argus newspaper (1887-1962), who had their printing works in this lane. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Argyle Street 1814 Parramatta Surveyor James Meehan planned new streets in the southern end of the settlement of Parramatta in 1814. Argyle Street was one of these streets. As it was completed during the administration of Governor Macquarie, it was presumably named after Argyllshire, Macquarie’s home county in Scotland. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Wickham, J. A. & Yeend, P. J., 1979, Origins of names of suburbs, streets, and localities in and about the Parramatta area. Parramatta, NSW: The King’s School Archive Society.
Jervis, J., 1935, ‘The development of settlement in the town of Parramatta’, Journal and Proceedings of the Parramatta District Historical Society, vol. 4, p. 72.
Jervis, J., 1961, The cradle city of Australia: a history of Parramatta 1788 – 1961, The Council of the City of Parramatta, Australia, p. 37.
Arthur Street Parramatta PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Auburn Street Parramatta
Auctioneer Lane 2016 Parramatta In 1827 John Taylor was born in Parramatta. As a young man he travelled to California where he made lots of money building coaches in the goldfields of America. Returning to Parramatta with his fortune, 28-year-old John set up an Auction Mart that once fronted Church Street. Goods for auction would have been loaded and stored out the back near this laneway. Step right up! Described as ‘a man of abundant energy’, John would buy and sell anything—furniture, household goods, gadgets—even property across the district. John and his brother Hugh were entrepreneurs. If there was money to be made, they would look into it. Brown, S. & Brown, K., 1995, Parramatta: a town caught in time, 1870, Sydney: Hale & Iremonger.
Back Lane Parramatta This lane was probably named because it passed at the back of two rows of houses that faced onto other roads. This lane was 60 feet wide. On 1 January 1806, W.M. Shelley leased land said to be on the back row. Town of Parramatta [cartographic material], c 1790-2, adapted from Plants at P.R.O. and in Bonwick Papers.
Banks Street Parramatta Acknowledging Sir Joseph Banks (1743-1820), botanist with Captain Cook, part of a street naming theme used in the subdivision. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Barham Street 1947 North Parramatta or East Parramatta. Developed by the Housing Commission of NSW and named by the Commission as an acknowledgment to Alderman Major Kenneth H. Barham who was killed in action in Greece on 12 April 1941 during World war 2. An enlarged portrait was also hung in the vestibule of Parramatta Town Hall as a tribute. Part of Collett’s property subdivision. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
City of Parramatta, c1994, Suburban names review: part 1. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council.
Suggested names For three new streets(1946, August 28). The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate, p. 2.
Late Major Barham (1942, July 15). The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate, p. 1.
Barney Street North Parramatta PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Barrack Lane 1895 survey Parramatta 1822 plan shows prisoner barracks adjacent to what is now Barrack Lane. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Barton Street c1868 North Parramatta or East Parramatta. Acknowledges the Grantee of the land which adjoined, William Barton. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
City of Parramatta, c1994, Suburban names review: part 1. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council.
Batman Walk Parramatta William Batman pioneer carrier (1765-1834). Watson, J., 2000, Men of Parramatta, Parramatta, p. 1.
Bellevue Lane North Parramatta The name “Bellevue” is derived from the French words for “beautiful view”. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Bellevue Street North Parramatta The name “Bellevue” is derived from the French words for “beautiful view”. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Belmore Street c1868 North Parramatta or East Parramatta. Acknowledges Somerset Lowry-Corry, Lord Belmore, who had been appointed Governor of NSW in 1868. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
City of Parramatta, c1994, Suburban names review: part 1. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council.
Betts Street c1840 Parramatta Acknowledges the Betts family. John Betts, husband of Mary Marsden, took a major role in the dispersal of the Marsden estate on behalf of the inheritors after the death of Samuel Marsden in 1838. Josiah Betts had also married Martha Marsden and several members of the Betts family resided in Parramatta for generations. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
City of Parramatta, c1994, Suburban names review: part 1. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council.
Board Street North Parramatta Named after William Henry and Emily Board who lived in the area. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Parramatta & District Historical Society, 2003, Parramatta pioneer register: settlement to 1920, Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta & District Historical Societyp 31.
Bobart Street Parramatta Rev Henry Hodgkinson Bobart succeeded Rev Samuel Marsden as rector of St John’s Parramatta in 1838 after servings as curate in the parish from 1837. He married Elizabeth, Marsden’s second daughter in 1837. Rev Bobart was appointed headmaster of the King’s School Parramatta in January 1854 until his sudden death in July of the same year. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Jervis, J., 1963, A short history of St John’s Parramatta, Parramatta, N.S.W. : Ambassador Press, p. 37
Kass, T., Liston, C., & McClymont, J., 1996, Parramatta: a past revealed. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council, p 166-7
Boundary Street Parramatta Boundary of the Municipality of Parramatta c. 1913. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Parramatta Street map showing municipal boundaries, c. 1913, Robinson’s Street Directory Maps
Bourke Street North Parramatta Possibly named for Governor Richard Bourke who succeeded Major General Sir Thomas Brisbane as Governor of NSW from 1831-37. Government House at Parramatta while not his principal residence was a personal retreat from Sydney. Six months after his arrival in the colony his wife Elizabeth died and was buried in St John’s Cemetery. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Kass, T., Liston, C., & McClymont, J., 1996, Parramatta: a past revealed. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council, p 92.
Bowden Street c1856 North Parramatta or East Parramatta. Initially named George Street by the inheritors of George Palmer’s estate, at the time of the subdivision. The name was later changed to avoid confusion and now appears to be an acknowledgement of Thomas Kendall Bowden, Mayor of Parramatta in 1869. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
City of Parramatta, c1994, Suburban names review: part 1. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council.
Brabyn Street c1841 Parramatta In the subdivision of Charles Marsden’s 50 acre parcel the street naming appears to have been selected by his wife Elizabeth, nee Brabyn. The other names used appear to acknowledge Elizabeth’s son Mason, and her sister, Mary Gaggin, nee Brabyn. City of Parramatta, c1994, Suburban names review: part 1. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council.
Brickfield Street Parramatta The area containing Brickfield Street was first mentioned in October 1805, when Rowland Hassall wrote to Governor King concerning “the low ground about the Brickfields, Parramatta”. It was part of a property of eighteen acres originally granted to the Reverend Samuel Marsden in 1782.
The Australian of October 1826 referred to John Jones, master brickmaker, as living at the Brickfields, and also made reference to the brickmakers’ gang – all convicts – working there.
Evidently the area ceased to be used for making bricks during the 1830s.
Wickham, J. A. & Yeend, P. J., 1979, Origins of names of suburbs, streets, and localities in and about the Parramatta area. Parramatta, NSW: The King’s School Archive Society.
Jervis, J., 1935, ‘The development of settlement in the town of Parramatta’, Journal and Proceedings of the Parramatta District Historical Society, vol. 4, p. 80.
Bridge Street Parramatta Probably named because it led to the bridge across the river. This street was 110 feet wide Town of Parramatta [cartographic material], c 1790-2, adapted from Plants at P.R.O. and in Bonwick Papers.
Bristol Street North Parramatta PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Broughton Street c1919 Parramatta Recalls the name of one of The Kings School preparatory houses which stood nearby, ‘Broughton House’. The name in turn is an acknowledgement to Bishop Rev. William Grant Broughton for his particular contribution to The Kings School itself. City of Parramatta, c1994, Suburban names review: part 1. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council.
Brown Street North Parramatta Developed by the Housing Commission as part of the Gilbert Estate North Parramatta subdivision in 1948. It was drawn by Parramatta surveyor Harold Charles de Low. In keeping with the theme of naming streets after Parramatta mayors and aldermen, this street was named after Robert James Brown who was a Parramatta alderman from 1920 to 1937. Change of name, 1948, June 30, The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate,p. 3.
City of Parramatta, 2011,Section 4.2 Special character areas, in Parramatta development control plan 2011, p. 13
Bulk Receipts Street Parramatta PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Buller St c1844 North Parramatta and East Parramatta Initially only a small nib (off Victoria Rd) was created, the full length being extended in 1868. The names appears to acknowledge Barrister and Parliamentarian Charles Buller who, in conjunction with James Macarthur, tirelessly supported the cause of the Australian Patriotic Association to gain representative government in NSW. Buller died in 1846 and it seems fitting that the names Buller and Macarthur stand side-by-side in this subdivision layout. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
City of Parramatta, c1994, Suburban names review: part 1. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council.
Burnett Street North Parramatta PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Burnham Place (Previous name: Byrnes Street) 5.10.1965 North Parramatta In accordance with Local Government Act 1919, Ordinance 30, Clause 53, Section 249(a). The cul-de-sac section was renamed after parts of the former Byrnes Street between Hunt Street and Moxham Street and the unclosed part of Moxham Street and Forbes Street, Parramatta was widened. Authorised by resolution of Council on 5 October 1965. City of Parramatta. – Local Government Act 1919, Ordinance 30, Clause 53, 1966, March 4, Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales, p. 1084
Burnside Street North Parramatta Named in reference to Burnside Homes PCC Street Name Register.pdf
By Street Parramatta
Byrnes Avenue Parramatta Named after the Byrnes family, a pioneer family in Parramatta. In the late 1830s, James (1806–1886) and his brother William were landowners and manufacturers in Parramatta. The Byrnes brothers were also pioneers of steam ferry transport on the Parramatta River and in 1840-41 established a steam flourmill near the wharf. They also owned a brewery on Charles Street. James Byrnes was also a politician and public servant who represented Parramatta. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Walsh, G. P., no date, ‘Byrnes, James (1806–1886)’, Australian Dictionary of Biography, National Centre of Biography, Australian National University.
Casey & Lowe, no date, Archaeological excavation: corner of George & Charles Streets, Parramatta. Retrieved from http://www.caseyandlowe.com.au/pdf/leafletg.pdf
Byrnes Street North Parramatta Named after the Byrnes family, a pioneer family in Parramatta. In the late 1830s, James (1806–1886) and his brother William were landowners and manufacturers in Parramatta. The Byrnes brothers were also pioneers of steam ferry transport on the Parramatta River and in 1840-41 established a steam flourmill near the wharf. They also owned a brewery on Charles Street. James Byrnes was also a politician and public servant who represented Parramatta. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Walsh, G. P., no date, ‘Byrnes, James (1806–1886)’, Australian Dictionary of Biography, National Centre of Biography, Australian National University.
Casey & Lowe, no date, Archaeological excavation: corner of George & Charles Streets, Parramatta. Retrieved from http://www.caseyandlowe.com.au/pdf/leafletg.pdf
Cameron Place 1947 Parramatta Developed by the Housing Commission of NSW and named by the Commission as an acknowledgement to a 1930’s Parramatta Councillor, Alderman Mr E. Cameron. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
City of Parramatta, c1994, Suburban names review: part 1. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council.
Campbell Street 1814 Parramatta The emancipist surveyor James Meehan, who owned his position to Governor Macquarie, named Campbell Street in 1814. The name remembers the maiden name of the Governor’s second wife. Wickham, J. A. & Yeend, P. J., 1979, Origins of names of suburbs, streets, and localities in and about the Parramatta area. Parramatta, NSW: The King’s School Archive Society.
Jervis, J, ‘The development of settlement in the town of Parramatta’, Journal and Proceedings of the Parramatta District Historical Society, p. 72.
Carrington Street (Previous name: Hassell Street) Parramatta Probably named after Charles Robert Wynn Carrington, the Governor of NSW from 1885-1890. It had previously been called Hassell Street before 1886. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Borough Of Parramatta (1886, July 27). New South Wales Government Gazette, p. 5024. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article222752922
http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/carrington-charles-robert-3169
Castle Street North Parramatta
Charles Street Street is marked on the 1822 plan of Parramatta, origin not discovered. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
China Rose Walk 1822 plan Parramatta The Red Cow Inn, which once stood on the site of the carpark from the early 1800s to 1867, was surrounded by a beautiful lush garden of China roses and pomegranates. People came from all around to stay at this cosy pub and they remarked at the fragrant China Roses. The plants were a fashionable luxury. The British had not long before settlement discovered them growing in China. It is a story of romance and of global trade with both China roses and pomegranates sailing from one country to another to make a famous garden in Parramatta.
Church Street (Previous name: Quaker’s Row) 2016 Parramatta It was named Church Street as it led to St John’s Church. The street was 143 feet wide. As there were several such families living there, Church Street was originally known as Quaker’s Row. When Quaker’s Row was extended to run to St. John’s Church, it was renamed Church Street by Governor Macquarie. Church Street became an important section of the colonial road system, linking Sydney with the farms of the Hawkesbury district along the Sydney Road – Church Street – Windsor Road axis. Brown, S. & Brown, K.,1995, Parramatta: a town caught in time, 1870, Sydney: Hale & Iremonger.
Wickham, J. A. & Yeend, P. J., 1979, Origins of names of suburbs, streets, and localities in and about the Parramatta area. Parramatta, NSW: The King’s School Archive Society.
Jervis, J., 1935, ‘The development of settlement in the town of Parramatta’, Journal and Proceedings of the Parramatta District Historical Society, vol. 4, p. 71.
Houison, A 1903, ‘Odd Bits in the History of Parramatta’, Journal and Proceedings of the Royal Australian Historical Society, vol. 1, no. 7, p. 118.
Kass, T., Liston, C., & McClymont, J., 1996, Parramatta: a past revealed. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council, p 24.
Town of Parramatta [cartographic material], c 1790-2, adapted from Plants at P.R.O. and in Bonwick Papers.
PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Civil Place 1790; 1822 plan Parramatta Behind Parramatta Town Hall.
Collett Parade 1947 Parramatta Developed by the Housing Commission of NSW and named by the Commission as an acknowledgement to Mr. A. H. Collett, proprietor of the Gladstone Dairy, which operated in this vicinity prior to World War II. Mr Collett was Mayor of Parramatta from 1912 to 1914 and from 1927 to 1930. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
City of Parramatta, c1994, Suburban names review: part 1. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council
Corry Court Parramatta and East Parramatta. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Council Roads(?) North Parramatta PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Cowper Street 1895 survey Parramatta Charles Cowper of Narellan, member for The County of Cumberland elected 1830. Cowper turned the first sod of the extension of the line from terminus of the railway to Blacktown in vicinity of present Parramatta Station. Kass, T., Liston, C., & McClymont, J., 1996, Parramatta: a past revealed. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council, p 147.
Jervis, J., 1961, The cradle city of Australia: a history of Parramatta 1788 – 1961,Parramatta, N.S.W.: The Council of the City of Parramatta, Australia, p 61.
Crimea Street Parramatta Named after the Crimean War, 1854-56. This is in line with the theme of naming streets after a significant event for this subdivision. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Crosswell Place Parramatta Developed by the Housing Commission as part of the Gilbert Estate North Parramatta subdivision in 1948. It was drawn by Parramatta surveyor Harold Charles de Low. In keeping with the theme of naming streets after Parramatta mayors and aldermen, this street was named after Charles Isaac Crosswell who was a Parramatta alderman from 1928 to 1937. City of Parramatta, 2011, Section 4.2 Special character areas, in Parramatta development control plan 2011, p. 13
Daking Street 1915 North Parramatta Part of Daking Estate North Parramatta. Land transferred to Alfred Edwin Daking Smith in 1913 from Charles Ernest Byrnes. Land was subsequently subdivided in 34 lots and auctioned on 18 December 1915 with frontages to Church, Bourke, Hunt and Daking Street. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
vol-fol 1736-202 –> 2670-47, 2882-155 etc
Parramatta Council. New buildings., 1915, June 2, The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate, p. 1
Daking estate, North Parramatta, 1915, December 4, The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate, p. 7
Current news. Parramatta works, 1916, March 29, The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate, p. 2
Daking Estate Parramatta North [Subdivision plan], 1915, Apperture card Z/SP/P6/78
Darcy Street (D’Arcy Street) 1895 survey Parramatta D’Arcy Wentworth, a medical practitioner, arrived in Sydney, as ship’s surgeon, on the transport Neptune, in June 1790. He was appointed assistant surgeon and superintendent of convicts at Norfolk Island. In 1799 he was appointed surgeon at Parramatta. He later leased land in the vicinity of D’Arcy Street, before 6 acres were granted to him in 1799. In 1810 he was granted twelve acres. The land belonging to him became known as Wentworth Woodhouse. It was called Woodhouse, after an English property where the Earl of Stafford was buried after being beheaded.
Mr D’Arcy Wentworth was the father of W.C. Wentworth.
Wickham, J. A. & Yeend, P. J., 1979, Origins of names of suburbs, streets, and localities in and about the Parramatta area. Parramatta, NSW: The King’s School Archive Society.
Jervis, J., 1935, ‘The development of settlement in the town of Parramatta’, Journal and Proceedings of the Parramatta District Historical Society, vol. 4, p. 75 and p. 86.
Jervis, J., 1961, The cradle city of Australia: a history of Parramatta 1788 – 1961,Parramatta, N.S.W.: The Council of the City of Parramatta, Australia, p 21.
Godden Mackay Logan, 2000, ‘1844 Plan of the town of Parramatta and the adjacent properties’, in Parramatta historical archaeological landscape management study, volume 3: map volume
Davies Street North Parramatta PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Denison Street Parramatta Possibly named after Sir William Thomas Denison (1804-71) who was Governor of NSW from 1854-61 and nominal Governor-General of the Australian colonies. H was previously Governor of Tasmania and later Governor-General of India. fort Denison in Sydney is also named after him. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Street names of Rockhampton, 1932, February 6, The Evening News, p. 6.
Dirrabarri Lane 2016 Parramatta Dirrabarri is a Darug language word for Ironbark. It is a type of eucalyptus tree endemic to Parramatta, with hard timber perfect for making shields, coolamons and other tools. The name was provided by a member of Council’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Committee. One of the first things the newcomers did when settling Parramatta in 1788, was to cut down Ironbark and other trees. Much of the wood went to timber yards, like the one that developed near the site of this lane, where logs were prepared and used to build Parramatta, and places further afield. Kass, T., Liston, C., & McClymont, J., 1996, Parramatta: a past revealed. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council
Brown, S. & Brown, K.,1995, Parramatta: a town caught in time, 1870, Sydney: Hale & Iremonger.
University of New South Wales, no date, Dharug Dictionary, Dharug and Dharawal resources.
Troy, J., 1994, The Sydney language, Canberra, A.C.T.: www.williamdawes.org/docs/troy_sydney_language_publication.pdf
Dixon Street Parramatta PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Dunlop Street Parramatta PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Early Street North Parramatta PCC Street Name Register.pdf
East Street Parramatta
Edgewater Parade Parramatta Street no longer exists PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Elizabeth Lane Parramatta gazetted 28/04/1979; resolution 10/04/1978? PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Elizabeth Street 1822 plan Parramatta Elizabeth Street leads down to the Parramatta River. The name remembers Elizabeth Macarthur (1766-1850) who lived at Elizabeth Farm just over the other side of the river. Wickham, J. A. & Yeend, P. J., 1979, Origins of names of suburbs, streets, and localities in and about the Parramatta area. Parramatta, NSW: The King’s School Archive Society.
Jervis, J., 1935, ‘The development of settlement in the town of Parramatta’, Journal and Proceedings of the Parramatta District Historical Society, vol. 4, p. 73.
Erby Place Parramatta G.T. Erby (Wycombe House) draper 1890’s. Erbys were a well known Parramatta family. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Kass, T., Liston, C., & McClymont, J., 1996, Parramatta: a past revealed. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council, p 216.
Factory Street Parramatta Possibly named due to proximity to the Parramatta Female Factory PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Fennell Street c1822 North Parramatta (c1822) initially commenced as a small a bit off Church Street and gradually extended throughout. The name acknowledges Captain John Fennell, Aide-de-Campe to Governor Brisbane. Fennell Street was one of the first streets in the area and was a result of Brisbane’s attempt in 1823 to sort out the chaos resulting from previous indiscriminate lease-holds. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Wickham, J. A. & Yeend, P. J., 1979, Origins of names of suburbs, streets, and localities in and about the Parramatta area. Parramatta, NSW: The King’s School Archive Society.
Jervis, J., 1961, The cradle city of Australia: a history of Parramatta 1788 – 1961,Parramatta, N.S.W.: The Council of the City of Parramatta, Australia.
Jervis, J., 1935, ‘The development of settlement in the town of Parramatta’, Journal and Proceedings of the Parramatta District Historical Society, vol. 4, p. 68 and p. 73.
City of Parramatta, c1994, Suburban names review: part 1. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council.
Ferris Street Parramatta, North Parramatta and East Parramatta PCC Street Name Register.pdf
First Street Parramatta
Fitzwilliam Lane Parramatta PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Fitzwilliam Street 1895 survey Parramatta 4th Earl Fitzwilliam William Wentworth kinsman of D’Arcy Wentworth. Street is within D’Arcy Wentworth’s land grant. Godden Mackay Logan, 2000, ‘1844 Plan of the town of Parramatta and the adjacent properties’, in Parramatta historical archaeological landscape management study, volume 3: map volume
Fleet Street Parramatta PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Forbes Street Parramatta Street no longer exists PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Fourth Street North Parramatta One of four streets named in this subdivision between James Ruse Drive and Vineyard Creek.
Franklin Street Parramatta
Freemason’s Arms Lane Parramatta James Larra built Mason’s Inn about 1800, later known as Freemason’s Arms (following the custom in England, Scotland and Ireland, Masonic Lodges often held their meetings in inns) it stood on the site of the present Court House. Sold to Andrew Nash in 1821, and was renamed Woolpack Inn. The site was sold in 1887 to the government for a new court complex for 8500 pounds. Woolpack Inn reopened across the road on the site of Marsden’s first church. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Kass, T., Liston, C., & McClymont, J., 1996, Parramatta: a past revealed. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council, p 78.
Gaggin Lane c1841 Parramatta See details on Braybn. Acknowledges Charles Marsdens sister-in-law Mary Gaggin, nee Brabyn whose husband was the Commissariat Storekeeper at Windsor. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Gaggin Street c1841 North Parramatta In the subdivision of Charles Marsden’s 50 acre parcel the street naming appears to have been selected by his wife Elizabeth, nee Brabyn. Gaggin Street acknowledges Charles Marsden’s sister-in-law, Mary Gaggin, nee Brabyn, whose husband was Commissariat Storekeeper at Windsor. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
City of Parramatta, c1994, Suburban names review: part 1. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council.
Galloway Street Parramatta PCC Street Name Register.pdf
George Street (Previous name: High Street) c1791 and progressively extended North Parramatta George Street Parramatta was the second major street planned in Australia, the first being George Street Sydney. It was laid out by Lt. William Dawes in July 1790. It was planned as a broad axial way from the square at the landing wharf on the river to up to the foot of the rise where a small Government House had been built. In the original plans, it was to be “One mile in length and two hundred feet in breadth.” Captain Watkin Tench reported in December 1791 that “The Great Road from near the Landing Place to the Governor’s House, is finished, and a noble one it is, being of great breadth, and a mile long in a straight line”. It was originally referred to as “High Street” or “the Great Road”, until Governor Arthur Phillip named it George Street in 1811 in honour of his king, George III. George Street remained the principle urban street in Parramatta for more than eighty years. Brown, S. & Brown, K.,1995, Parramatta: a town caught in time, 1870, Sydney: Hale & Iremonger.
Proudfoot, H., 1974, Historic buildings & sites in Parramatta, Sydney, N.S.W.: New South Wales Planning and Environment Commission.
Phillip, A., 1790, July 14, Governor Phillip to the right Hon. W.W. Grenville, in Historical records of New South Wales, vol. 1, part 2, Mona Vale, N.S.W.: Lansdown Slattery & Co., p.362.
Wickham, J. A. & Yeend, P. J., 1979, Origins of names of suburbs, streets, and localities in and about the Parramatta area. Parramatta, NSW: The King’s School Archive Society.
Houison, A., 1903, ‘Odd Bits in the History of Parramatta’, Journal and Proceedings of the Royal Australian Historical Society, vol. 1, no. 7, p. 118
Swann, M., 1902, ‘George Street Parramatta’, in Journal and Proceedings of the Royal Australian Historical Society, vol. 2, p. 95.
PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Gibb Close Resolution 20.08.1979 Parramatta PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Gilbert Street North Parramatta Part of Mount Pleasant Estate North Parramatta originally owned by George Henry Gilbert (19.07.1861-11.04.1908)
Gladstone Lane North Parramatta PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Gladstone Street 1868 North Parramatta Acknowledges William Wart Gladstone on his rise to Prime Minister of Britain in 1868 at the time the street was being formed. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
City of Parramatta, c1994, Suburban names review: part 1. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council
Glebe Street North Parramatta or East Parramatta. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Gloucester Avenue Parramatta PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Good Street c1883 North Parramatta Initially named ‘Elizabeth’ street acknowledging Macarthur’s grand-daughter Elizabeth Onslow. Being a prolongation of Good Street Granville (which had been created twenty years earlier) postal confusion developed to the extent that Granville Council changed the name in 1907. The name Good appears to have been selected for real estate marketing purposes. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Gore Street 1915 Parramatta When created in a subdivision of part of the School property this street was called Kings School Street. The name was later changed to acknowledge Revered W.F. Gore, Clergyman and Master of The King School from 1854 to 1862. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
City of Parramatta, c1994, Suburban names review: part 1. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council
Gould Place 1965 Parramatta Acknowledges Solicitor John Morton Gould who purchased the land in 1855 and built ‘Morton House’ thereon, later selling the house to Henry Harvey in 1862. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
City of Parramatta, c1994, Suburban names review: part 1. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council.
Grandview Street 1914 Parramatta Appears to have been selected for real estate selling advantages. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
City of Parramatta, c1994, Suburban names review: part 1. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council.
Great Western Highway 1815 Parramatta Originally part of a track around the Mays Hill ridge, which became known in 1815 as the Western Road. A survey in 1822 shows the road was now called the Great Western Road. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Godden Mackay Logan, 2000, ‘1844 Plan of the town of Parramatta and the adjacent properties’, in Parramatta historical archaeological landscape management study, volume 3: map volume
Brown, S. & Brown, K., 1995, Parramatta: a town caught in time, 1870, Sydney: Hale & Iremonger.
Gregory Place (Previous name: Cliff Street) Parramatta Was originally known as Cliff Street after J W Cliff, one time owner of Elizabeth Farm. After the property changed hands several times the then owner of nearby Hambledon Cottage, Mr E S Gregory (manager of Whitehall (now Wyeth) Pharmaceuticals handed the property to public ownership. Cliff Street was confused with similar names in Parramatta and in the 1960s was changed in acknowledgement of Mr Gregory. City of Parramatta, c1994, Suburban names review: part 1. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council, p. 66
Grose Street pre-1822 Parramatta The area including Grose Street was originally leased by Achelous Keen, and later broken up into smaller holdings.
Major Francis Grose was born in 1754, and came to New South Wales in 1792, as first commander of the New South Wales Corps. He was Lieutenant Governor of the Colony after the departure of Governor Phillip, and held this position until he resigned, in May 1794, due to complications caused by his war wounds. Grose Street was named after him.
Wickham, J. A. & Yeend, P. J., 1979, Origins of names of suburbs, streets, and localities in and about the Parramatta area. Parramatta, NSW: The King’s School Archive Society.
Jervis, J., 1927, ‘The road to Parramatta’, in Journal and Proceedings of the Royal Australian Historical Society, vol. 13, no. 2, p. 83Jervis, J., 1935, ‘The development of settlement in the town of Parramatta’, in Journal and Proceedings of the Parramatta District Historical Society, vol. 4, p. 68 and p. 73.
Proudfoot, H. & Horn, M., 1974, Historic buildings and sites in Parramatta, Sydney, N.S.W.: New South Wales Planning and Environment Commission & City of Parramatta, p. 19
City of Parramatta, c1994, Suburban names review: part 1. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council
Harold Street Parramatta PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Harris Street (Previous name: Elizabeth Street) c1810 and extended c1860 and 1876 Parramatta The street was created around 1814 and was originally named Elizabeth Street. The name was later changed to Harris Street. Acknowledging Surgeon Dr John Harris (1754-1838) and his inheriting nephews and grand-nephews. Harris Street is within Dr Harris’ land grant. The name was first used in Macquarie’s time but as “Harvey or Harris Street”. Thomas Harris extended it as “Harris Street South” in 1860, but in grand-nephew John Harris’ subdivision the name of Harris was used. City of Parramatta, c1994, Suburban names review: part 1. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council.
Godden Mackay Logan, 2000, ‘1844 Plan of the town of Parramatta and the adjacent properties’, in Parramatta historical archaeological landscape management study, volume 3: map volume
Kass, T., Liston, C., & McClymont, J., 1996, Parramatta: a past revealed. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council, p. 15.
Harvey Street 1921 Parramatta Acknowledges Henry Harvey who purchased land in the vicinity of the subdivision in which the road was created. A mill owner, Harvey was a very active investor in real estate throughout the Parramatta district in the 1860’s. City of Parramatta, c1994, Suburban names review: part 1. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council
Hassall Street c1876 and extended 1883 Parramatta Acknowledging James Hassall, grantee of the property which adjoined the street. Street parallel to south boundary of Hassall estate. City of Parramatta, c1994, Suburban names review: part 1. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council
Godden Mackay Logan, 2000, ‘1844 Plan of the town of Parramatta and the adjacent properties’, in Parramatta historical archaeological landscape management study, volume 3: map volume
Henry Street 1925 Parramatta Acknowledges the dairy farmer who owned the land at the time of subdivision, Heinrich (‘Henry’) Gottsch. City of Parramatta, c1994, Suburban names review: part 1. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council.
High Street Parramatta Named for the fact that it was the main street of the town at the time. Name later changed to George Street. High Street was 205 feet wide. Town of Parramatta [cartographic material], c 1790-2, adapted from Plants at P.R.O. and in Bonwick Papers.
Horwood Place Parramatta Named after Headley Victor Horwood, Mayor OBE during June 1965, 1954-55, Alderman during 1948-1953 and 1956-1968. Kass, T., Liston, C., & McClymont, J., 1996, Parramatta: a past revealed. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council, p 398.
Houison Place Resolved 23/06/1980 Parramatta
Hunter Street 1810 Parramatta Governor Macquarie named Hunter Street on 12 December 1810. The name remembers Governor John Hunter, second Governor of the colony 1795-1800. Wickham, J. A. & Yeend, P. J., 1979, Origins of names of suburbs, streets, and localities in and about the Parramatta area. Parramatta, NSW: The King’s School Archive Society.
Jervis, J., 1935, ‘The development of settlement in the town of Parramatta’, Journal and Proceedings of the Parramatta District Historical Society, vol. 4, p. 72.
Illawong Drive Parramatta Of Aboriginal origin. Public road leads to Lake Parramatta. The word “Illawong” has been used as a place name in various parts of Australia. One possible meaning is “view of the water”. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Inkerman Street North Parramata Appears to be named after the Battle of Inkerman fought during the Crimean War in 1854. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Iron Street Parramatta PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Irving Street 1894 and extended 1914 North Parramatta Acknowledges an initial land grantee in this vicinity, assistant surgeon John Irving, who was granted 30 acres in 1792 adjacent to Parramatta River. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
City of Parramatta, c1994, Suburban names review: part 1. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council
Irwin Street Parramatta Developed by the Housing Commission as part of the Gilbert Estate North Parramatta subdivision in 1948. It was drawn by Parramatta surveyor Harold Charles de Low. In keeping with the theme of naming streets after Parramatta mayors and aldermen, this street was named after William John Irwin who was a Parramatta alderman from 1936 to 1947. City of Parramatta, 2011, Section 4.2 Special character areas, in Parramatta development control plan 2011, p. 13
Isabella Lane North Parramatta
Isabella Street 1869 North Parramatta The name origin is uncertain. In the final subdivision of the Town Reserve by the Surveyors Generals Office the street naming selection acknowledged European and Colonial personages of the day at the time when Queen Isabella of Spain was being forced into exile. Concurrently Governor Brisbane’s daughter Isabella Maria born in the Colony in 1821 was on her death bed in Scotland. A very high regard for Brisbane and his family appears to have remained in Parramatta for many years after their return to Scotland. The street name may be a tribute to Isabella Maria MacDougall Brisbane. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
City of Parramatta, c1994, Suburban names review: part 1. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council.
James MacArthur Court (Previous name: Macarthur Street) 2000 North Parramatta Formerly known as Macarthur Street, the formed road generally running northerly from the intersection of Belmore Street and Corry Court to Bellevue Street, North Parramatta Parramatta City Council: Roads Act (General Regulations) 1994: Renaming of public road – James Macarthur Court,2000, July 28, Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales, p. 7125.
James Ruse Drive (Previous name: Orphan School Lane, Orphan School Road, Rydalmere Avenue) 27.03.1981; 2.02.1981 Parramatta or East Parramatta The genesis of today’s Freeway in this location was a narrow lane heading from Kissing Point Road to the Orphan School, a lane which was known as Orphan School Lane or Road. After the function of the Orphan School was changed to become Rydalmere Psychiatric Centre the lane was widened and took the name of Rydalmere Avenue. The erection of the bridge linking the road to Aston Street, Rosehill, in 1963 was the commencement of the Freeway system which is now in place, a system which when completed in the 1980’s was named after the famed colonial experimental private farmer, James Ruse. It has also been known as Orphan School Lane or Orphan School Road, and Rydalmere Avenue at different time periods. City of Parramatta, c1994, Suburban names review: part 1. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council.
James Ruse Drive Service Lane Parramatta PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Jeffery Avenue North Parramatta Developed by the Housing Commission as part of the Gilbert Estate North Parramatta subdivision in 1948. It was drawn up by Parramatta surveyor Harold Charles de Low and in keeping with the theme of naming streets after Parramatta mayors and aldermen was named after Phillip Henry Jeffery who was a Parramatta alderman from 1925 to 1948. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
“Much Too Modest”, 1948, March 3, The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate, p. 1
Jessie Street Gardens 1988 Parramatta A lane which connects O’Connell, Macquarie and George Streets, the lane is part of Jessie Street Centre. The Jessie Street Centre takes its name from the activist Jessie Street. Jessie Street Centre Newsletter Summer Edition 2008
Jubilee Lane 3/07/1989 ; Gazetted 25/08/1989 Parramatta On the northern side of Marion street, Harris Park, giving access to Jubilee Park http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article231520718
Kanangara Avenue North Parramatta Kanangra is an Aboriginal word meaning ‘beautiful view’ or ‘a ceremonial and meeting corroboree site of significance’ for the Awabakal and Darkinjung people PCC Street Name Register.pdf
“Aboriginal Words and Their Meanings” by JH Sugden – https://history.lakemac.com.au/page-local-history.aspx?pid=1085&vid=20&tmpt=narrative&narid=3218
“Awabakal Word Finder” J Maynard – https://history.lakemac.com.au/page-local-history.aspx?pid=1085&vid=20&tmpt=narrative&narid=1925
Katia Street North Parramatta Part of Dress Circle Estate subdivision plans 1919-1925. Dress circle refers to the old picture theatres (now cinemas) where an upper level was called “dress circle”. According to a Dress Circle Estate monument in East Ryde, Hooker Rex Pty Ltd retained the original name of the Dress Circle Estate and named the streets according to a theatrical theme. Here it looks like the theme was World War One related with the close proximity of Katia Street (for the Battle of Katia on 23 April 1916) to Romani Street (for the Battle of Romani on 3-5 August 1916). PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Dress Circle Estate Parramatta North [Subdivision plan], 1919, Aperture card Z/SP/P6/133
Dress Circle Estate Parramatta North [Subdivision plan], 1925, Aperture card Z/SP/P6/134
Dress Circle Estate No. 2 Parramatta North [Subdivision plan], 1929, Aperture card Z/SP/P6/135
Wikipedia contributors, 2018, Battle of Katia, in Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia
Monument Australia, 2010-2019, Dress Circle Estate
King Lane Parramatta PCC Street Name Register.pdf
King Street Parramatta
Kissing Point Road 1813 Parramatta Originally a shorter road called the High Road. In December 1813 the road was clearly defined and extended to Kissing Point (Ryde) and called Kissing Point Road. Kass, T., Liston, C., & McClymont, J., 1996, Parramatta: a past revealed. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council, p. 15.
Kendall Street 1878 Parramatta Thomas Kendall Bowden, cousin and partner of subdividing solicitor G.W. Allen, in “family names” street naming theme used by subdividing solicitor George Wigram Allen. City of Parramatta, c1994, Suburban names review: part 1. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council.
Kleins Road North Parramatta Believed to be named after the Klein family who owned the orchard on this road. Comment from local resident Paul
Lake Street North Parramatta PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Lamont Parade 1895 survey Parramatta PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Lamont Street Parramatta PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Lansdowne Street c1855 Parramatta Meaning: a fine lightweight dress fabric in twill weave with a silk or rayon warp and a worsted or cotton filling. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Bowden & Threlkeid, 1855-56 subdivision map
West Lansdowne Street Parramatta
Lennox Street Parramatta Unclear. Possibly named after David Lennox, who built several stone bridges in Parramatta in the 1930s. He built the Lansdowne Bridge, which spans Prospect Creek between Parramatta and Liverpool. He also built the Lennox Bridge which spans across the river in the centre of Parramatta. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Brown, S. & Brown, K.,1995, Parramatta: a town caught in time, 1870, Sydney: Hale & Iremonger.
Little Street Parramatta PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Long Avenue Parramatta
Macarthur Street c1840s and 1868 Parramatta, and Parramatta North or Parramatta East Appears to represent two separate acknowledgements. The section southerly of Victoria Road provided in the subdivisions of the Marsden properties probably acknowledges Hannibal Hawkins Macarthur. A custom of street naming in subdivisions of this period was to name at least one of the streets after a magistrate of leading citizen and H.H. Macarthur was both: he became the first elected representative for Parramatta in 1843. The section northerly of Victoria Road was provided in the final subdivision of the Town Reserve effected by the Government and, on the street naming pattern used by the Surveyor General’s Office, it would appear that the name acknowledges James Macarthur. James, who played a major role in serving the district (and in achieving representative government in NSW) had died less than twelve months earlier. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
City of Parramatta, c1994, Suburban names review: part 1. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council.
Macarthur Street Service Lane Parramatta PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Macquarie Lane Resolution 23/06/1980 Parramatta Off Smith Street between Macquarie and George Streets. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Macquarie Street 1792; 1806; 1811 Parramatta Originally Macquarie Street was known as either Back Row or South Street. On 1 January 1806, W. M. Shelley leased land said to be on “the back row”. Lachlan Macquarie was born in Scotland in 1762, and succeeded William Bligh as Governor of New South Wales, in 1810. One of his first acts was to lay out the town of Parramatta, and to plan new streets. On 6 May 1811, he named Macquarie Street. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Wickham, J. A. & Yeend, P. J., 1979, Origins of names of suburbs, streets, and localities in and about the Parramatta area. Parramatta, NSW: The King’s School Archive Society.
Rivett, C., no date, ‘Time in the Hills’, vol. 1.
Jervis, J., 1961, The cradle city of Australia: a history of Parramatta 1788 – 1961, Parramatta, N.S.W. : The Council of the City of Parramatta, p. 26.
Jervis, J., 1935, ‘The development of settlement in the town of Parramatta’, Journal and Proceedings of the Parramatta District Historical Society, vol. 4, p. 71-2.
Manse Lane Parramatta PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Marion Street c1878 Parramatta Acknowledging (Lady) Marian Allen (nee Boyce), wife of G.W. Allen, in ‘family names’ street naming theme used by subdividing solicitor George Wigram Allen. City of Parramatta, c1994, Suburban names review: part 1. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council.
Marist Place Gazetted 29/04/1966;
Resolution 7/03/1966
Parramatta PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Market Street 1871 plan Parramatta Originally Crown Land bordered by The River, Pennant, Marsden and Church Streets.
Marsden Street 6 May 1810; Gazetted 29/04/1966 and Resolution 7/03/1966 Parramatta The Reverend Samuel Marsden was the first chaplain to the Parramatta District, holding this office from 1795 until his death in May 1838. He was also a large landholder and farmer, made several missionary trips to New Zealand, and was, at time, one of the local Parramatta magistrates. Governor Macquarie named the street after him on 6 May 1810. Wickham, J. A. & Yeend, P. J., 1979, Origins of names of suburbs, streets, and localities in and about the Parramatta area. Parramatta, NSW: The King’s School Archive Society.
Rivett, C., no date, ‘Time in the Hills’, vol. 1
Jervis, J., 1961, The cradle city of Australia: a history of Parramatta 1788 – 1961,Parramatta, N.S.W.: The Council of the City of Parramatta, Australia.
Mary Street North Parramatta PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Mason Street c1841 Parramatta In the subdivision of Charles Marsden’s 50 acre parcel the street naming appears to have been selected by his wife Elizabeth, nee Brabyn. Mason Street acknowledges Mason Marsden, child of the subdividers, Charles and Elizabeth Marsden. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
City of Parramatta, c1994, Suburban names review: part 1. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council.
Melville Street 1965 Parramatta and East Parramatta Acknowledges former landholder in the vicinity of the subdivision, Thomas Melville who, in 1794 purchased Webb’s grant, which later passed to William Evans and to George Palmer. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
City of Parramatta, c1994, Suburban names review: part 1. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council.
Morton Street c1856 Parramatta or East Parramatta Initially named Palmer Street by the inheritors of George Palmer’s estate at the time of subdivision. Solicitor John Morton Gould had erected a residence close to this street which he called ‘Morton House’ (later changed by The Kings School to ‘Macarthur House’) and when a street naming change was necessary in 1916, the street was re-named in accordance with Gould’s distaff surname, Morton. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
City of Parramatta, c1994, Suburban names review: part 1. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council.
Moxham Street North Parramatta PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Murray Street 1883 North Parramatta or East Parramatta. Acknowledges William Richard Murray, Storekeeper who purchased a farm lot in the auction of the Town Reserve subdivision in the 1870’s and subdivided into urban lots 10 years later. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
City of Parramatta, c1994, Suburban names review: part 1. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council.
Napier Street Parramatta PCC Street Name Register.pdf
New Street North Parramatta PCC Street Name Register.pdf
New Zealand Street c1850 Parramatta or East Parramatta Set out in a subdivision of part of the Marsden estate and located nearby to the training establishment, (‘Rangihou’) which Marsden had set up in order to westernise selected New Zealand Maori youth. The street was named to perpetuate that memory. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
City of Parramatta, c1994, Suburban names review: part 1. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council.
Noller Parade c1947 Parramatta By Housing Commission, acknowledging William Peter Noller, builder, Mayor of Parramatta 1901 to 1909 and 1923 to 1927. Initially this strip was a footway between benevolent asylum buildings through which Jeanneret’s tramway ran, giving rise to it being called ‘Tramway Avenue’. During the 1920s the asylum fell into obsolescence and, later, the tramway ceased. The Housing Commission absorbed the property into a housing scheme, widening the access way to form Noller Parade in 1947. City of Parramatta, c1994, Suburban names review: part 1. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council.
North Rocks Road North Parramatta PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Northcott Lane Gazetted 11/01/1980 and Resolution 2/01/1980 Parramatta Laneway is adjacent to Northcott School for Crippled Children between Grose and Fennell Street, North Parramatta. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Parramatta City Council.—Local Government Act, 1919.—Ordinance No. 30, Clause 53.—Naming of a road, 1980, January 11, Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales, p. 178
O’Connell Street (Previous name: Clifford Street) 1811 Parramatta Sir Maurice Charles O’Connell (1768-1848) was Lieutenant Colonel of the 73rd Regiment, which accompanied Governor Macquarie to New South Wales. After service with the 73rd, in New South Wales, he went overseas, but he returned in 1838 to serve as Commander in Chief (until 1847) in New South Wales. He remained in the colony until his death in 1848, having also been a member of the Legislative Council.
O’Connell Street first appears in 1811 when further improvements in Parramatta were affected. Macquarie mentions visiting the area for this purpose with Surveyor Meehan on December 12 1810.
PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Wickham, J. A. & Yeend, P. J., 1979, Origins of names of suburbs, streets, and localities in and about the Parramatta area. Parramatta, NSW: The King’s School Archive Society.
Jervis, J., 1935, ‘The development of settlement in the town of Parramatta’, Journal and Proceedings of the Parramatta District Historical Society, vol. 4, p. 72.
Australian Dictionary of Biography, vol. 2, p. 294-95
Kass, T., Liston, C., & McClymont, J., 1996, Parramatta: a past revealed. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council, p 147.
O’Reilly Street Parramatta PCC Street Name Register.pdf
City of Parramatta – local government act, 1919, 1967, December 1, Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales, p. 4493.
Oak Street 1883 and 1904 Parramatta Not clear. As the land and creek bed in which this street was positioned was cleared land (that is, without trees) it is considered that the street name was probably intended to be “Oakes Street” in acknowledgment of Hon. George Oakes, first Member for Parramatta, who had been accidentally killed in 1881. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
City of Parramatta, c1994, Suburban names review: part 1. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council.
Orphan School Lane Parramatta See James Ruse Drive.
Orphan School Road Parramatta See James Ruse Drive.
Palmer Lane Parramatta PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Palmer Street 1823 Parramatta John and George Palmer were Parramatta gentry in the 1820s.
John Palmer (1760-1833) was the first Commissary-General in New South Wales, from June 1791 to July 1811. He had arrived in the colony with the First Fleet in the Sirius, and had taken up part time farming at Woolloomooloo and on the Hawkesbury River.
When he died in 1833 Palmer was recorded as “the last remaining officer of the First Fleet”.
Palmer Street was officially recorded on government maps for the first time on 8 May 1823.
PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Wickham, J. A. & Yeend, P. J., 1979, Origins of names of suburbs, streets, and localities in and about the Parramatta area. Parramatta, NSW: The King’s School Archive Society.
Jervis, J., 1935, ‘The development of settlement in the town of Parramatta’, Journal and Proceedings of the Parramatta District Historical Society, vol. 4, p. 73.
Kass, T., Liston, C., & McClymont, J., 1996, Parramatta: a past revealed. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council, p 93-94.
Park Parade Parramatta PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Parkes Street Gazetted 12/01/1979
Resolution 24/07/1978
Parramatta 1895 survey was a continuation of Wentworth Street. Probably named after Sir Henry Parkes or possibly after Varney Parkes, son of Henry Parkes and an architect, who lived in Parramatta at Experiment Farm Cottage in 1884. It was previously known as Ethel Street. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Kass, T., Liston, C., & McClymont, J., 1996, Parramatta: a past revealed. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council,p 214.
Parramatta Park Land (Lane?) Parramatta PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Parramatta Road 1789 Parramatta It began in 1789 when Governor Phillip employed a team of convicts to mark out a trail through the scrub between Sydney and Parramatta. Within three years the road was in dire need of repairs. In 1805 heavy rains washed away the entire path and made other parts of the road unnegotiable. Proper repairs did not begin until Governor Macquarie arrived in 1817. He published his plan in the Sydney Gazette, stating that “The whole line of road… will be rough paved with stone, and then covered with earth and gravel… which must necessarily prevent in future these deep and disagreeable ruts.” Charles, M., 1988, Old Parramatta: pictorial memories, Crows Nest, N.S.W.: Atrand.
Pemberton Lane c1856 Parramatta Set out as a narrow street called Davies Street in the subdivision of George Palmer’s estate but not claimed as a public road for many years. In the subdivision of The Kings School properties in the 1960’s the lane was widened and, as it adjoined Pemberton Street, was named Pemberton Lane. The name itself derives from Palmer’s wife Catherine, nee Pemberton. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
City of Parramatta, c1994, Suburban names review: part 1. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council.
Pemberton Street c1856 Parramatta Set out in the subdivision of George Palmer’s estate known as ‘Pemberton Grange’ the street name perpetuates the old property. The name itself derives from Palmer’s wife Catherine, nee Pemberton. Although always being part of Pemberton Street, the curved section connecting Victoria Road to Pennant Street (and which adjoined Mr Short’s property) was locally known as ‘Shorts Corner’ for many years. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
City of Parramatta, c1994, Suburban names review: part 1. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council.
Pennant Hills Lane Parramatta PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Pennant Hills Road North Parramatta A road leading to the suburb of Pennants Hill. Possible place name origin for the suburb:
(1) Name possibly derived from the practice of using flags, or pennants, to signal between Sydney Cove and Parramatta
(2) Named after botanist and zoologist Thomas Pennant (1726-1798) a colleague and friend of Sir Joseph Banks
(3) Named in reference to the Crimson Rosella (Latin: Psittacus pennanti), a common bird in the Pennant Hills area. Also known as Pennant’s Parakeet in English bird magazines.
PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Patrick, T. G., c1994, Street names of Pennant Hills and surrounding suburbs of Beecroft, Cheltenham, Cherrybrook, Thornleigh, Westleigh and West Pennant Hills. Hornsby, N.S.W. : Silicon Quill.
Pennant Street pre 1822 Parramatta The name implies (from a survey viewpoint) that a flagstaff (or ‘pennant’ in naval terms) stood nearby. The street commenced from the Gaol site (now Prince Alfred Park), a point which perfectly triangulates between Government House, Constitution Hill, Queens Wharf and ‘Brush Farm’, an excellent intelligence semaphoring position. The street was also the starting point of the ‘High’ road which led to the relay signalling pennant (near ‘Brush Farm’) at today’s Marsden Road/Stewart Street intersection.
Most of the old street name has now been changed to ‘Victoria Road’ as, initially, Pennant Street connected O’Connell Street through Kissing Point Road. The name change between Pemberton Street and Church Street occurred during the 1930s; between Church and O’Connell Streets in the 1970s.
PCC Street Name Register.pdf
City of Parramatta, c1994, Suburban names review: part 1. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council.
Phillip Lane 1895 survey Parramatta Off Philip Street. The lane was named in 1810 after Governor Arthur Phillip, first Governor of the colony between 1788-1792, and was the founder of Parramatta. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Wickham, J. A. & Yeend, P. J., 1979, Origins of names of suburbs, streets, and localities in and about the Parramatta area. Parramatta, NSW: The King’s School Archive Society.
Jervis, J., 1935, ‘The development of settlement in the town of Parramatta’, Journal and Proceedings of the Parramatta District Historical Society, vol. 4, p. 72.
Phillip Street 1810 Parramatta Governor Macquarie, assisted by James Meehan, the ex convict deputy survey general, planned Parramatta as a network of streets crossing at right angles. The street was named in 1810 after Governor Arthur Phillip, first Governor of the colony between 1788-1792, and was the founder of Parramatta. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Wickham, J. A. & Yeend, P. J., 1979, Origins of names of suburbs, streets, and localities in and about the Parramatta area. Parramatta, NSW: The King’s School Archive Society.
Jervis, J., 1935, ‘The development of settlement in the town of Parramatta’, Journal and Proceedings of the Parramatta District Historical Society, vol. 4, p. 72.
Pitt Lane Gazetted 6/01/1978
Resolution 5/12/1977
Parramatta PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Pitt Street Parramatta Originally built as a dirt track by early settlers to join the original Redoubt and a nearby bridge. It was originally called Bridge Street. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Kass, T., Liston, C., & McClymont, J., 1996, Parramatta: a past revealed. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council, p. 15.
Prince Street North Parramatta Probably named in honour of King George and the Royal Dukes. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Purchase Street c1883 Parramatta Acknowledging Samuel Purchase and family who conducted a horticultural nursery on the adjoining land to this street. City of Parramatta, c1994, Suburban names review: part 1. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council.
Quaker Row Parramatta See Church Street.
Queens Avenue 1884 Parramatta Originally set out as ‘Victoria Street’ honouring the then Queen of England, a name change need arose when another Victoria Street nearby (now Victoria Road) became well established in the 1890 period. The substitute name, deferring to the Queen, was selected in place of Victoria Street. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
City of Parramatta, c1994, Suburban names review: part 1. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council.
Railway Lands Parramatta The railway from Sydney to Parramatta was the first railway line in New South Wales. It reached Parramatta in 1855, and was continued on across the Domain in 1860. Proudfoot, H., 1974, Historic buildings & sites in Parramatta, Sydney, N.S.W.: New South Wales Planning and Environment Commission.
PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Railway Parade Parramatta
Railway Street Parramatta PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Rangihou Crescent 1955 Parramatta An acknowledgement of ‘Rangihou’, a missionary building which formerly stood in this location. Samuel Marsden used the mission for the westernisation of selected Maori youth at one stage, the name deriving from Rangihou Bay in New Zealand. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
City of Parramatta, c1994, Suburban names review: part 1. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council.
Raymond Street Parramatta
West River Road c1883 Parramatta Named ‘river’ to indicate the favourable real estate advantages of lots which offered water frontage for transport purposes; and ‘west’ of the Clay Cliff Creek system. Half of the road was absorbed in 1909 by the establishment of a sewer farm adjacent to Clay Cliff Creek. To compensate four lots were purchased to allow a new outlet to Aston Street to be constructed in 1911, the outlet also taking the name River Road West. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Rivoli Way 2016 Parramatta In the 1900s, a popular entertainment palace stood nearby the location of this lane off Church Street South. Attracting big crowds when it opened in 1911 as a cinema, it was later converted into a roller skating rink and named the Rivoli. Known as ‘The Riv’ it was the place to have fun, socialise, go dancing or watch boxing and wrestling. Despite the craze of rock and roll, ‘old time dancing’ was still popular with the locals in in the 60s. Parramatta’s Rivoli closed in 1968. Arfanis, P., 2014, January 16,The Rivoli. Parramatta’s bygone entertainment venue
Robertson Lane Parramatta Acknowledges John Robertson, owner of the property being subdivided. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Robertson Street c1913 Parramatta Acknowledges John Robertson, owner of the property being subdivided. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
City of Parramatta, c1994, Suburban names review: part 1. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council.
Romani Street North Parramatta Appears to be named after the Battle of Romani which took place in Palestine in 1916 during WW1. Members of the 1st and 2nd Light Horse Brigades were particularly active in this battle. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Rose Crescent c1936 North Parramatta Acknowledges owner/developer Sydney Brozel Rose, solicitor of Sydney who subdivided his property near Lake Parramatta into 38 allotments and created two new streets – Rose Crescent and Gloucester Avenue PCC Street Name Register.pdf
“P’matta rate one of lowest”: Mayor’s claim: What the council has done, 1937, November 25, The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate, p. 6.
Rosehill Street Parramatta Street in Rosehill, this area was named Rose Hill in honour of George Rose, secretary to the Treasury by Governor Arthur Phillip in November 1788. The name has contracted to one word over the years. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Kass, T., Liston, C., & McClymont, J., 1996, Parramatta: a past revealed. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council, p 14.
Ross Street 1823 Parramatta and North Parramatta Robert Ross was an officer in the marines and arrived in New South Wales with the First Fleet as commander of the marines and lieutenant governor of the colony.
Ross later served as officer in charge of Norfolk Island, was relieved of this position, and returned to England in December 1791. Ross Street was names in his honour in 1823.
PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Wickham, J. A. & Yeend, P. J., 1979, Origins of names of suburbs, streets, and localities in and about the Parramatta area. Parramatta, NSW: The King’s School Archive Society.
MacMillan, D.S., no date, Australian Dictionary of Biography, vol. 2, p. 397-98.
Jervis, J., 1935, ‘The development of settlement in the town of Parramatta’, Journal and Proceedings of the Parramatta District Historical Society, vol. 4, p. 73.
Rydalmere Avenue Parramatta Avenue no longer exists. See James Ruse Drive. Name was initially given after Orphan School Lane or Road was widened for Rydalmere Psychiatric Centre (former Orphan School). It is now part of James Ruse Drive.
Saunders Lane North Parramatta PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Saunders Street North Parramatta PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Second Street Parramatta
Seville Street North Parramatta Name in acknowledgement of the Seville family. Joseph Seville, son of William Seville, was the first land grant owner around the North Parramatta area. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Short Street Parramatta PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Smith Street Previous name: Taylor Street) 1822 plan Parramatta Smith Street was named after James Smith who was a well known builder in Parramatta during Macquarie’s administration. He arrived free on the Lady Penrhyn and was the first farm superintendent. He built a house for Samuel Marsden in 1816 or 1817. On 3 January 1818 he was granted land between Sydney Road, Creek, Beckett’s Creek and Duck River. He appears to have occupied and fenced it almost immediately. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Wickham, J. A. & Yeend, P. J., 1979, Origins of names of suburbs, streets, and localities in and about the Parramatta area. Parramatta, NSW: The King’s School Archive Society.
Jervis, J., 1961, The cradle city of Australia: a history of Parramatta 1788 – 1961, Parramatta, N.S.W. : The Council of the City of Parramatta, p. 167.
Sorrell Lane Gazetted 22/07/1977
Resolution 14/03/1977
North Parramatta Unknown origin. Most likely named after Lieutenant-Governor William Sorell (1775-1848). Although the name is usually spelled with one ‘r’ it does on occasion appear with tow. Sorell was appointed lieutenant-governor of Van Diemen’s Land in 1816 and reached Sydney in March, 1817. During his stay in Sydney, Sorell is said to have ‘impressed’ Governor Macquarie before resuming his journey south. It is not known if he met Macquarie at Government House in Parramatta or in Sydney. Macquarie liked to name his streets after the ‘royalty’ of the Colony. Grose, Ross, Palmer and Pennant Streets were named at about the same time as Sorrell and it is not unreasonable to assume that a street would be named after Macquarie’s second in command (and a fellow Governor). PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Bray, S., 2011, February 28, Internal staff email.
Casey & Lowe, 2004, 1 Smith Street, Parramatta. Retrieved from http://www.caseyandlowe.com.au/site1smith.htm
Sorrell Street 1822 plan Parramatta Unknown origin. Most likely named after Lieutenant-Governor William Sorell (1775-1848). Although the name is usually spelled with one ‘r’ it does on occasion appear with tow. Sorell was appointed lieutenant-governor of Van Diemen’s Land in 1816 and reached Sydney in March, 1817. During his stay in Sydney, Sorell is said to have ‘impressed’ Governor Macquarie before resuming his journey south. It is not known if he met Macquarie at Government House in Parramatta or in Sydney. Macquarie liked to name his streets after the ‘royalty’ of the Colony. Grose, Ross, Palmer and Pennant Streets were named at about the same time as Sorrell and it is not unreasonable to assume that a street would be named after Macquarie’s second in command (and a fellow Governor). PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Bray, S., 2011, February 28, Internal staff email.
South Street Parramatta Named because it was in the South of the town. Later named Macquarie Street. This street was 110 feet wide. Town of Parramatta [cartographic material], c 1790-2, adapted from Plants at P.R.O. and in Bonwick Papers.
Station Street 1895 survey Parramatta Parallel to railway.
East Station Street c1878 Parramatta Named for real estate selling purposes indicating the advantages of being close to railway station facilities. City of Parramatta, c1994, Suburban names review: part 1. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council.
West Station Street Parramatta PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Steele Lane Parramatta PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Steele Street Parramatta PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Stewart Lane Parramatta PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Stewart Street 1884 Parramatta Acknowledges Mr Neil Stewart, the subdivider. His daughter had married into the Betts family (in-laws of the Marsdens) but Stewart, a prominent citizen of Parramatta, later acquired this property in his own right. City of Parramatta, c1994, Suburban names review: part 1. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council.
Suspense Street Parramatta PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Sutherland Road (Previous name: Gloucester Avenue) Resolution 2/06/1958 and Gazetted 17/06/1958 North Parramatta This area was auctioned as the Parramatta Heights Estate on 2 May 1925, by real estate agents, Peach Brothers. Construction of housing commenced in the 1930’s. In May 1939 the area was covered by a residential district proclamation that required the external walls of houses to be of brick construction.
In June 1958, parts of the street was altered with the Sutherland Road section between Prince Street and Pennant Hills Road renamed Prince Street and the Gloucester Avenue section between Sutherland Road and Pennant Hills Road renamed Sutherland Road.
City of Parramatta, 2011, Section 4.2 Special character areas, in Parramatta development control plan 2011, p. 14-15
PCC Street Name Register.pdf
City of Parramatta – Local Government Act, 1919, 1958, June 27, Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales, p. 1977
Symonds Avenue 1947 Parramatta Developed by the Housing Commission of NSW and named by the Commission as an acknowledgement to Parramatta Solicitor and Mayor at the time of subdivision, Alderman H.M. Symonds. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
City of Parramatta, c1994, Suburban names review: part 1. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council.
Teale Place c1869 Parramatta Initially part of Harold Street which became separated into two parts after the Council the land which now constitutes Doyle Ground in the 1920’s. To solve postal confusion which was being caused in the 1960’s a name change was required. The name chosen acknowledges Sid Teale who, in spite of being wheel-chair bound, was the driving force behind junior football and cricket in East Parramatta during the 1950’s and 1960’s. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
City of Parramatta, c1994, Suburban names review: part 1. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council.
Tennyson Street Parramatta Acknowledges Baron Hallam Tennyson, Governor General in Australia between 1902-1904. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
City of Parramatta, c1994, Suburban names review: part 1. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council.
Third Street Parramatta
Thomas Street c1840 and 1844 plan Parramatta Acknowledges Jane Marsden’s husband, Howard Thomas, who died in 1837. Howard was granted land in the area of “Ponds Creek”. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
City of Parramatta, c1994, Suburban names review: part 1. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council.
Thomas Street Service Lane Parramatta PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Toll Street North Parramatta Named in connection with the early toll house that was located around the area PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Tramway Avenue Parramatta South Grand Avenue, between Alfred and James Ruse Drive. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Trott Street Parramatta PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Union Street 1913 Parramatta This street functionally ‘unites’ two other streets but also appears to be part of the sub-theme referring to the American Revolution and the War of Independence. The war itself had the effect of converting loosely connected states into a “union”. City of Parramatta, c1994, Suburban names review: part 1. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council, p. 47
United Lane 1895 survey, Gazetted 1/05/1964 and Resolution 16/04/1964 Parramatta PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Valentine Avenue Parramatta In a 1895 survey, Cowper Street originally extended from Fitzwilliam to Parkes, but this section of Cowper Street has been renamed Valentine Avenue. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Victoria Road Parramatta The name acknowledges Victoria, Queen of England. The road itself was formed in sections springing from ‘Victoria Street’ (created in the Vineyard Estate subdivision in 1879) on the east and absorbing Pennant Street to the west. It took until the 1970’s for the name to be uniformly applied throughout it’s current length. This road was the second continuous thoroughfare to be built between Parramatta and Sydney, Parramatta Road being the first. Wickham, J. A. & Yeend, P. J., 1979, Origins of names of suburbs, streets, and localities in and about the Parramatta area. Parramatta, NSW: The King’s School Archive Society.
Geeves, P., 1970, A place of pioneers: the centenary history of the Municipality of Ryde, Sydney, N.S.W.: Halstead Press.
City of Parramatta, c1994, Suburban names review: part 1. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council
Villiers Street Parramatta Possibly named for Victor Albert George Child Villiers, Earl of Jersey who was Governor of NSW 1891-1893. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Randwick City Council, no date, Street names s-z
Walden Road North Parramatta PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Wandsworth Street c1885 Parramatta Unclear. Created in Parramatta storekeeper T.M. Sheppard’s subdivision, the name presumably recalls the suburb of London, Wandsworth. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
City of Parramatta, c1994, Suburban names review: part 1. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council
Waugh Avenue North Parramatta PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Webb Street c1869 Parramatta Acknowledges the 1792 land grantee in the vicinity, Robert Webb. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
City of Parramatta, c1994, Suburban names review: part 1. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council
Wentworth Street 1895 survey Parramatta Street is within D’Arcy Wentworth’s land grant. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Godden Mackay Logan, 2000, ‘1844 Plan of the town of Parramatta and the adjacent properties’, in Parramatta historical archaeological landscape management study, volume 3: map volume
West Street Parramatta
Western Motorway Parramatta
Wilde Avenue Parramatta Mayor Barry Wilde, mayor of Parramatta from 1967-1974. PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Kass, T., Liston, C., & McClymont, J., 1996, Parramatta: a past revealed. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council, p. 381.
William Lane North Parramatta PCC Street Name Register.pdf
William Street North Parramatta PCC Street Name Register.pdf
Woodhouse Lane 2016 Parramatta Darcy Wentworth, born in Ireland in 1762, was related to the noble and wealthy Woodhouse family of Yorkshire, England. Having arrived in Parramatta in 1790 he took up the role of assistant surgeon and later chief police magistrate and treasurer of the police fund. He became very wealthy. His first land grant was for 147 acres spanned part of today’s Parramatta Square, the train station, and a vast area to the south. On the edge of this laneway is where Darcy built his two story mansion, called ‘Wentworth Woodhouse’. Set amongst a grove of oranges, the mansion was very large compared to the simple huts and tents that housed the convicts and settlers. Darcy’s Woodhouse did not rival its namesake in Yorkshire. With over 300 rooms it is still one of the largest private houses in England. Kass, T., Liston, C., & McClymont, J., 1996, Parramatta: a past revealed. Parramatta, N.S.W.: Parramatta City Council
Auchmuty, J. J., 1967, ‘Wentworth, D’Arcy (1762–1827)’, Australian Dictionary of Biography, National Centre of Biography, Australian National University. Retrieved from http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/wentworth-darcy-1545
Young Street Parramatta