ANZAC Day 2020

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ANZAC Day is one of Australia’s most important national days of commemoration. On this day we remember all those who served, and those who sacrificed their lives, in all conflicts Australia has participated in.

The date of 25 April was selected to mark this day of commemoration. It is the anniversary of the first major military action fought by the ANZACs (Australian and New Zealand Army Corps) at Gallipoli during World War One in 1915. This military action is recognised as the beginning of ANZAC ideals of mateship and sacrifice that distinguish and unite all Australians.

Each year Australia commemorates this day with services and marches, however this year, our world health situation prevents us from doing so. This year, the Parramatta Heritage Centre invites you to join us in remembering ANZAC Day 2020 by following us on our social media platforms and exploring our featured articles, historical images and publications, compiled by Research Services Team & volunteers, on this website.

More information about ANZAC Day can be found on the City of Parramatta Council page: ANZAC Day 2020

We Will Remember Them

Lest We Forget

Parramatta ANZACS – World War One

ANZAC Day is one of Australia’s most important national days of commemoration. On this day we remember all those who served, and those who sacrificed their lives, in all conflicts Australia has participated in.
The date of 25 April was selected to mark this day of commemoration. It is the anniversary of the first major military action fought by the ANZACs (Australian and New Zealand Army Corps) at Gallipoli during World War One in 1915. This military action is recognised as the beginning of ANZAC ideals of mateship and sacrifice that distinguish and unite all Australians.

World War One – William Castles – Darug Soldier

William Castles was a 19 year old coal carter whose mother Ada Locke and father Thomas Castles were stated to be dead when he enlisted 15 May 1916. Philippa Scarlett has written an article on William's aboriginal and Darug heritage which details his relationships in...

Parramatta ANZACS at Gallipoli 1915

On 25 April 1915, the Allied assault on the Gallipoli Peninsula in Turkey began under the guidance of the Commander in Chief, Sir Ian Hamilton. The landing was divided into three assaults: the main one at the tip of the peninsula involved the British troops, a second...

Helles Memorial and Indian Soldiers

India played a significant part in World War One. The normal annual recruitment for the Indian army was 15,000 men, during the course of the war over 800,000 men volunteered for the army and more than 400,000 volunteered for non-combatant roles. In total almost 1.3...

1914-1919 Roll of Honor

Australia’s involvement in World War One began on 4 August 1914. Many who joined up believed that the war would be a great adventure, but none could have imagined the scale of the endeavour on which they were about to embark. Sadly, many of these soldiers, sailors,...

World War One and Parramatta Naval Officers

The impact of World War One on Australia’s economy was significant. At that time, the majority of exports from Australia were wool, wheat and minerals. Exporters were deprived of shipping services and they found it difficult to receive payments for their goods. For...

World War One & Suburbs

For Australia, the World War One remains the costliest conflict in terms of deaths and casualties. From a population of fewer than five million, 416,809 men enlisted, of whom more than 60,000 were killed and 156,000 were wounded, gassed, or taken prisoner. Another...

World War One & Killed in Action

Australia’s involvement in World War One began on 4 August 1914. Many who joined up believed that the war would be a great adventure, but none could have imagined the scale of the endeavor on which they were about to embark. Sadly, many of these soldiers, sailors,...

World War One – Served in Belgium

The First World War battlefields on the Western Front in France and Belgium were witness to an Australian story of great triumph and tragedy, of unimaginable losses to a young nation and an extraordinary part in the course of history. The impact of World War One on...

World War One and Battle of Beersheba

The Battle of Beersheba took place on 31 October 1917 during the third Battle of Gaza in Palestine. It was a defining moment that demonstrated the success of Manoeuvre Warfare in the region, and the power of mounted troops to rapidly redefine the outcome of a battle....

World War One – Honour Roll

The First World War (1914-1918) and those involved with the conflict, are often remembered through a variety of monuments ranging from statues to plaques. Honour rolls are a common example of such commemorative objects and can frequently be found in schools,...

World War One and Letters to Home

During the First World War, letter writing was the main form of communication between soldiers and their loved ones, this helped ease the pain of long term separation. Soldiers from Parramatta would write letters to home in their spare time, sometimes from the front...

World War One & Horse Soldiers

Animals played a vital role during World War One, especially horses. Australia sent more than 136,000 Australian horses overseas to support and serve. The type of war horse that was favoured by the light horsemen in the campaign were originally from New South Wales,...

Images From Our Collection